Cocaine

Cocaine is a Central Nervous System (CNS) stimulant that is derived from the leaves of the coca plant [genus: Erythroxylum], which is produced exclusively in Central and South America. Although it was once believed to be a non-addictive substance, cocaine is actually one of the most highly addictive illegal drugs in America. Crack cocaine is a modified version of cocaine that is even more addictive and has similar effects on the user.

Cocaine

Cocaine use acts directly on the brain’s reward system, sending positive signals every time it is administered. The powdered form is either snorted (inhaled through the nose) or injected via a syringe. Both methods enter the bloodstream very quickly and provide a fast high. Frequently snorting can lead to complete destruction of the septum, which is a piece of cartilage in the nose. Additionally, the drug profoundly alters brain chemistry. Cocaine abuse and cocaine addiction can lead to malnutrition (as a result of decreased appetite), heart attack, stroke, and death – even in young, healthy individuals. If the addict has been injecting cocaine, they may also be at risk for skin abscesses, Hepatitis C, and endocarditis (heart problems).

If you suspect that someone you know if addicted to cocaine, a cocaine intervention is likely necessary for the addict to begin the recovery process. eDrug Rehab's cocaine treatment is a comprehensive program that helps everyone involved from the first phone call until all questions have been answered, long after discharge from the rehabilitation facility. Medical professionals will oversee the addict's cocaine detox process and professionals will guide the addict, family, and friends through the cocaine rehabilitation that follows.

 

Share us with your family and friends!
 
 

The material of this web site is provided for informational purposes only. We do not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment; or legal, financial or any other professional services advice.
See additional information.
Use of this site is subject to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

eDrugRehab